Fall Crop Planting

Fall Crop Planting

Wheat:  Due to lack of moisture, some might be getting anxious about planting their wheat.  The "ideal" planting date for yield (grain production) for North Central Okla. has historically been Oct. 10-20th, with an acceptable range of Oct. 1st-31., leaving plenty of time yet as of today.  For those using their wheat for grazing as well as yield we need a rain fairly soon, but depending on the fall weather we've seen Oct. 1st planted wheat make pasture.

Canola: According to the "experts" canola can be planted in this area from Sept. 12 to Oct. 6th ideally.  (I think Oct. 10th is insurance deadline, but not sure).

Canola needs about 1/3 more nitrogen than wheat, about 2.5 lbs. on N per bushel yield. It is suggested you put on about 1/3 of the nitrogen needs in the fall and the balance as a topdress to avoid excessive fall growth and more winter kill.  It also needs more sulfur than wheat and if a soil sample was not taken (you should have) then you might want to think about putting on about 10 to 20 lbs./acre preplant or as a topdress with N. Some suggest you apply the sulfur regardless of the soil test.This crop removes fairly large amounts of Phosporous (.9 lbs. /per bushel) and Potassium (.45 lbs./bushel) and these should be, or been, applied preplant. As with any oilseed you need to be very careful putting fertilizer "in row" with canola due to the salt content of the fertilizers and the potential to harm germination.  I would suggest broadcasting any P & K or getting off the seed row (such as a 2x2 fert. placement). Seed bed should be firm (almost like planting alfalfa) and seed placement 1/2 to 1 inch deep. Many local producers have had good luck with what is called a stale seed bed. Get the field ready, get a rain on it, and plant into the undisturbed soil. Usual seeding rate is around 5 lbs./acre and 6 to 15 inch spacing seems to work, but 30 inch spacing has led to reduce yields thus far. There has been some work done with applying Boron before flowering as the plant has a need for it at that time and you might want to consider that option.  Ther is still work being done with Boron, the rate will be low, and Boron can reach a toxic level, so care should be taken.

2 comments (Add your own)

1. Bazooka RIP wrote:
For wheat planted this week, with normal?? weather conditions, when is the optimum time to apply Olympus or similar herbicide?

Thu, September 30, 2010 @ 12:18 PM

2. Kim wrote:
Thanks for the question. All the grass herbicide labels (such as Olympus, Powerflex, Maverick, etc.) suggest the best time to apply their products is in the fall months, such as November. This has been proven be the most effective time in my "real world, real life" experiences as well. The chemicals have the most efficacy when the target grasses (usually cheat) are small and before they are winter hardened. Fall application also eliminates the competition earlier in the wheat plants life cycle. If you had cheat in your field in early March, it would usually still pay to spray but you could expect less control. The exception to the above might be Axial on rye grass. It seems to work about as well in the early spring as the fall, but the rye grass has competed with the wheat through out the winter.

Fri, October 1, 2010 @ 9:15 AM

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