Thoughts on the Crops

Thoughts on the Crops

                                                                  

“For the despondent, every day brings trouble;

For the happy heart, life is a continual feast.”   Proverbs

I haven’t written anything lately and the reasons are twofold: There hasn’t been anything really happening that we could control, and everything that has been happening is depressing.

As many of you have or may not have heard the Oklahoma wheat crop has been estimated to come to somewhere between 60-65 million bushels. About half of last year.  That wheat crop report was made on April 30th and most of the “counting” was done 2 to 3 days prior to that.  Since that time with the abnormally hot temperatures, lack of moisture and wind the crops have done nothing but lose yield.

The late freezes did in fact have an impact on both wheat and winter canola.  White heads, heads trapped in the boot, flag leaf loss, tiller loss are all evident as you examine the wheat, and “goose necked” stems, dropped flowers and aborted pods are evidenced in the canola. 

                       

BUT, in my opinion the lack of moisture (drought) has been “driving the bus” on the current poor condition of these two crops. We lost some yield by the freeze(s), but we may lose the crop by the drought.

According to mesonet data from Medford, Lahoma, and Breckinridge these crops have been working with about 2.5 to 3 inches since they were planted.  They hung in there well until about mid March.  When they wanted to go vertical, (come out) the tank was empty.  Insult to injury was the excessive temperatures and wind of early May.

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.  The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” Theodore Roosevelt

“Hats off” to ALL in production agriculture, the “men in the arena” and as with my beloved Oklahoma State Cowboys: There’s always next year.

                                                   

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